Which Of The Following Features Describe The Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (Caa)

Which Of The Following Features Describe The Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (Caa)

The question Wright faces – how his education can serve his economic ambition – is also a question facing the state. In 2019, North Carolina leaders sketched out an educational and economic vision for the future by announcing the state`s first goal. The goal is to produce enough qualified Northern Carolinians to meet the needs of the state`s economy, which is expected to have 2 million adults aged 25 to 44 with a post-secondary degree by 2030. To achieve this, the state needs to expand access to higher education and improve services for a wider range of North Carolinians. After caa, there is also more clarity for transfer routes. Each major in each university has its own requirements. The CAA required each college in the UNC system to publish “bachelor`s degree plans” that clearly describe which credits can be transferred and credited to each major. As long as students know which major to choose and which school to attend, they can plan the courses to follow. Higher education in North Carolina is what academics call “institution-focused.” That said, while there is a national agreement, most of the way the transfer actually works is due to policies and agreements between colleges. And there are hundreds of transfer agreements between the state`s 58 community colleges, 16 public universities, and 36 private universities. Perhaps the most important provision of the CAA is guaranteed admission to one of the 16 schools in the UNC system for anyone pursuing an associate degree in art or science at a North Carolina community college.

To be clear, it only guarantees admission to a school that may not be the school of choice for the student. Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (CAA): An agreement signed in 1997 and updated in 2014 that sets out the rules for transferring credits between the 58 community colleges and 16 schools in the UNC system. This led to the first Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (CAA), an agreement signed in 1997 that set out the rules for transferring credits between the 58 community colleges, the 16 schools in the UNC system, and the signatory independent colleges and universities. The first Independent Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (ICAA) was signed in 2007 between state-independent colleges and universities and the community college system. The North Carolina Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (CAA) is a statewide agreement that governs the transfer of credits between North Carolina community colleges and North Carolina public universities and aims for the smooth transfer of students. Caa gives certain assurances to the transfer student; For example: CAA also serves as the basis on which other agreements are built, often between a community college and a four-year college. These “bilateral” articulation agreements meet the specific needs of the population of a community college. For example, if a college sees that many of its students are interested in agriculture, it may turn to North Carolina A&T or North Carolina State and try to establish transfer rules that will help their students earn degrees in agricultural education or agribusiness technology. Students graduating from North Carolina community colleges in accordance with CAA guidelines will receive 64 semester credit hours at the UNC institution to which they are admitted. .